May 31 2015

April O’Neil Cosplay Costume Creation

Published by at 2:00 pm under Cosplay,Sewing

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Last weekend I went to Fanime Con 2015 as April O’Neil from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Check out the earlier post here for more fun pictures like those above with cosplayer David Volko as Shredder. In this post I’m going to talk about the construction of the costume since it was one of the more complicated — and fun! — sewing projects that I’ve ever done.

I wasn’t going to be designing this costume from scratch so I searched for a jumpsuit pattern that would be a good starting point. I came upon Simplicity 7310, a vintage 70’s pattern that I got used from a seller on Etsy. 

April O'Neil Cosplay Simplicity 7310

I went by the measurements on the package and hoped for the best since patterns from back then only came in one size and not multi-sized like they do now. Fortunately, they also seem to be more true to size back then. Also, the pattern was missing two pieces. One I didn’t need and the other was a facing that I was able to redraft from the back piece.

April O'Neil Cosplay Muslin

Before I officially agreed to do this cosplay, I wanted to make sure it was feasible by making a muslin of the pattern. I stitched up the body part (because I could always shorten the legs) and tested out making the back a separate piece since I’d need to split it out to do the yoke. You can see where I made the seam line markings on the muslin. It fit pretty well so the next step was ordering fabric. 

April O'Neil Cosplay Muslin

I placed an order for enough fabric in several different shades and weights from fabric.com. Well, when I finally got the shipping notice (several days later) there was no way it was going to arrive in time for me to work on the costume during the main weekend I had available for sewing it. So my friends and I took a trip to one of those fabric warehouses where I found this polyester fabric that I ultimately made it in.

April O'Neil Cosplay

I was a little worried because the fabrics I had ordered all had stretch in them and this one did not. It turned out fine and I think sewing the stretch fabric actually might have driven me up the wall. This polyester fabric turned out to be super easy to sew and pressed beautifully which really contributed to the enjoyment of the making process. And since I had sized the pattern correctly, the resulting costume had plenty of give. Plus I think this polyester is more true to fact of what such a jumpsuit would actually be made of.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Alright, let’s get to some sewing! I’m only highlighting the interesting parts and where I deviated from the pattern itself which I mostly followed.

Back Yoke

April O'Neil Costume Creation

The biggest deviation was adding a yoke to the back. I had already split the back into two pieces — a top half and bottom half — when I made the muslin. Now I needed to split the top half into a yoke and bottom. I traced out the shape I wanted and redrafted my back pattern. Then I redrafted the top half of that to give me the sides and the pleat you see above.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

First I pressed the pleat sides in and top stitched along those pressed edges.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Then I stitched the pleat to either side of the top half of the back.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Finished stitching.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Here’s the back laid out. I stay stitched the curved edge and clipped it so that I could sew it together nicely. This also held down the pleat.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Lots of pins to get the stay stitch seams to line up.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

And the curved seam after pressing. It wasn’t laying quite as flat as I’d like so I added some top stitching.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

After topstitching. You can see the seam allowances through the fabric. I know. If I had more time or if I had sewn this before, I would have serged them, but I wanted to keep them in case I had to rip any seams out and had to make it smaller or larger.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Some top stitching close up.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

And here’s the whole back piece. Now we’re back to the normal instructions since this is the shape of the original back piece.

April O'Neil Cosplay Detail

Front Patch Pockets

April O'Neil Costume Creation

The next item of interest is the front chest patch pockets. All the pockets on this costume are real functioning pockets — several of which I used on the day of. For these I did actually tack them down because the flaps were, well, flapping. If I had had more time I would have added velcro to them.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

I used the existing patch pocket pattern piece from the original pattern.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

But as you can see the flap was too big for April’s look.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

This was my first attempt as shrinking the flap. It did not work out so well. Too rounded although the width was a win.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

So I drafted a new flap using my desired width and giving it a slight curl.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

And finally, placement. I actually sewed one on first and then tried it on. Bad idea. I had to rip the whole thing off because it was way low. So on round two, I put the jumpsuit on and then pinned them to me in approximately the right spots and then evened them out. Then I stitched around them twice since the cartoon has extra thick lines there.

April O'Neil Cosplay Detail

Side Cargo Pockets

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Not on the original pattern were cargo pockets on the side. I looked at a number of tutorials online about how to sew cargo pockets and this was what I came up with.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

I sewed the corners. Then I top stitched the edges. Then I top stitched to sew it down for the final pockets.

April O'Neil Cosplay Detail

Faux Seams

April O'Neil Costume Creation

One thing which April’s jumpsuit has is way more seams than this one. Actually, correction: it just has seams in different places. The front ones are the most noticeable ones and they had to be there. Unfortunately I didn’t have time to redraft the legs which is the Right (TM) way to do that. Instead I fudged it a little. I added faux seams on the front and back of the legs and highlighted them with top stitching and then left the side seams on the legs un-top stitched to draw attention away from them.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

I made the faux seams by doing a little pin tuck to the inside.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Then I pressed it to the side (all faux seams were pressed towards the center) and top stitched along that tiny seam allowance. Pretty happy with how it turned out.

April O'Neil Cosplay Detail

Miscellaneous Details

And now for a couple of extra details that I only have a picture here and there.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

First was the knee patches. This one took two iterations as well as the first try was too skinny. But we got it on the second try. Se above for the finished look.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

The next were were April’s weirdly triangular hip pockets. For these I started with the original pockets from the pattern and then traced out the bottom curve. I also had to bring the top to a point instead of squaring it off. I top stitched the bottom edges to the pants, so again they were small, but functional pockets. I lined up the long edge top stitching with the leg seam so it seemed continuous since they if I had redrafted this, they would have been in that seam. Probably. 

April O'Neil Cosplay Detail

Finally, as you can see in the reference pictures from the last post, April seems to have some D-rings on the side. No idea what she ever uses those for, but there you go. Added those, too.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

Finally, a couple of close up shots of the cuff. Nothing really special here. For this I followed the directions of the original pattern. I didn’t add the button because I was going to be rolling them up. But I did do a faux french seam on the inner arm seam since that was going to be visible when I rolled it up and this fabric was fraying like crazy.

April O'Neil Costume Creation

What I didn’t do

There are a couple of details to April’s costume that I would have liked to do but ultimately decided were unnecessary. Namely, the redrafting of the legs and her back zipper pocket. But given that the zipper pocket only appears in some episodes (not sure if it’s the early or late ones), I decided to take artistic liberties.

April O'Neil and Shredder

April can be spunky when she wants to.

2 responses so far

2 Responses to “April O’Neil Cosplay Costume Creation”

  1. janeenon 15 Oct 2015 at 10:52 am

    Hello! love your jumpsuit!! I want to attempt to make one myself.. but i was wondering if you had any tips for someone who isn’t very familiar with following patterns. Also, I dont really follow how you did the fake seams. Would you recommend me just cutting the seams out of the fabric in the pattern and just sewing those pieces together?? Any help would be greatly appreciated!! Thank you!

  2. Pigleton 15 Oct 2015 at 1:06 pm

    Thank you so much! Hmm . . . this definitely ended up being one of my more complicated sewing adventures to date, although mostly because of all the alterations I made. If you don’t have much experience with sewing, I’d actually start with a more basic pattern (maybe something simple like pajama pants?). Pajama pants would also be good because they’d give you and idea of final measurements in the pants area that would be comfortable and fit you! If you’re mostly unfamiliar with following patterns but comfortable with sewing and garment construction, I wouldn’t worry about it too much. The pieces go together very logically for this pattern so the instructions are mostly a “guide.” I didn’t follow them too closely since I was making significant alterations.

    For the fake seams, I basically did a pintuck to the inside and then stitched over the fold of the pintuck. In case a pintuck is unfamiliar, it’s essentially folding a fabric and sewing very close to the fold so that the stitching creates a little ridge. Normally this is done on the outside (such as on a tuxedo shirt), but in my case, I did it to the inside to give the illusion of a seam. Keep in mind, the only fake seams I had were on the front and back of the legs. The rest were real seams.

    I would not just cut the fake seams out of the fabric unless you’ve sized up. This will make your legs much smaller than the expected finished measurement (by a little over 2 inches on each leg). If the legs are too baggy on you, then go for it. If you don’t want to fake the seams as I did, you could also cut the pattern pieces and then add seam allowances to the cut sections to account for the seam.

    Let me know if I can answer any other questions!

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